South America 3 Peaks Expedition – Phase 2: Monte Pissis, Part 2

Base Camp > Camp 1

Having rested my foot for only two days, we moved as a team up to camp 1. The route to camp 1 was initially a gentle ascent along two boulder-strewn valleys. After two hours carrying our heavy loads, we reached the first penitente fields and had the first clear views of Pissis summit. Our planned route to the summit closely followed the right-hand edge of the glacier. The ground began to steepen as we crossed a small glacial stream, and we were soon exposed to the full force of the wind, which seems ever-present in the Puna. We trudged uphill, with heads bowed, into the wind. By early afternoon, Dave had reached camp at 5,300m, and I joined him shortly after, by traversing left again and re-crossing the stream that runs off the glacier. Our campsite was compact, but big enough for two tents, and we reinforced the small rock wall to shelter ourselves from the wind.



That evening, we were blessed to witness a phenomenal sunset over the Andes.

Sunset from camp 1 on Monte Pissis

You can read the story of the whole expedition in the official Expedition Report below, which is also available for download:

South America 3 Peaks Expedition – Phase 1: Acclimatisation, Falso Morocho

The South America 3 Peaks Expedition took place in Dec 2013/Jan 2014. Carolina Morales, David Kenealy and I spent 35 days in the Puna de Atacama and High Andes of northern Argentina and attempted to climb Monte Pissis (6,795m), Ojos del Salado (6,893m) & Aconcagua (6,959m). The expedition was also the third leg of my long-term project to climb the Triple 7 Summits; the 3 highest peaks on each continent.

The first phase of the expedition was a 9-day acclimatization phase, where we would attempt to climb 4 peaks over 4,000m.

Falso Morocho – 4,500m

After a second night in Pastos Largos, we drove to Las Grutas refuge at 4,000m to continue our acclimatisation program. We stamped out of Argentina at the nearby border crossing, but did not officially enter Chile – since the Chilean border post is another 100km down the Paso de San Francisco.

You can watch my ipadio video blog below:

You can listen to my pre-ascent New Year message and satphone update below:

Falso Morocho was another easy high-altitude trek that took us just a few hours and helped our bodies adjust to the thin air in the high plateau of the Puna de Atacama – at 4,500m, the atmospheric pressure is only 58%, compared to 100% at sea level. It was another hot and clear day, and the views across the Laguna San Francisco were spectacular. We rested on the summit for more than an hour to gain maximum benefit from being at 4,500m, before descending down towards the laguna. On one of the small soda lakes, there was a large flock of flamingoes, and we tried to approach carefully in order to photograph them without disturbing them – but they scrambled out of the water and circled over our heads.

Meanwhile, Dave had received his bags from KLM and had transferred from La Rioja to Fiambala, and would now join us the following day.



The refuge was empty when we arrived, but soon filled up with a large group from the Catamarca Mountaineering Association and several itinerant long-distance cyclists. The mountain scenery around the refuge was extraordinary, with several 6,000m+ peaks visible, including Incahuasi, El Muerto, Chucula and San Francisco, which would be the final objective of our acclimatisation phase. Vicunas and guanacos roamed across the Puna, and we spotted several Andean condors soaring high overhead.

You can listen to Caro’s satphone update after our ascent – in Spanish – below.

You can read the story of the whole expedition in the official Expedition Report below, which is also available for download:

South America 3 Peaks Expedition – Phase 1: Acclimatisation, Pastos Largos

The South America 3 Peaks Expedition took place in Dec 2013/Jan 2014. Carolina Morales, David Kenealy and I spent 35 days in the Puna de Atacama and High Andes of northern Argentina and attempted to climb Monte Pissis (6,795m), Ojos del Salado (6,893m) & Aconcagua (6,959m).

The expedition had 3 objectives:
1. Mountain – To safely climb the 3 highest peaks in South America (6,700m+), including the first Venezuelan female ascent of all 3 peaks
2. Science – In partnership with Adventurers and Scientists for Conservation we supported ongoing scientific research on South America’s receding glaciers by collecting rock samples for analysis by world-class researchers in the US
3. Community – To raise a substantial sum of money for Macmillan Cancer Support to support cancer victims in the UK, and to inspire people to follow their own dreams

The expedition was also the third leg of my long-term project to climb the Triple 7 Summits; the 3 highest peaks on each continent.

The first phase of the expedition was a 9-day acclimatization phase, where we would attempt to climb 4 peaks over 4,000m.

Pastos Largos – 4,000m

After flying to La Rioja, Caro and I travelled on road by pickup to Fiambala, a small mountain town that served as our base for the expedition. Unfortunately, Dave’s bags had been missing since he arrived in Buenos Aires, so he stayed in La Rioja for the next four days to wait for them. Meanwhile, our four-hour road journey was interrupted by a roadblock about 100km from Fiambala. Locals were protesting against the Government, which delayed us for two hours before we negotiated our passage.

Next morning, we bought supplies for the next nine days, then drove 100km further towards the border with Chile to an area known as Pastos Largos, the site of an old hunting refuge at 3,500m. The next day, we climbed a nearby peak. After crossing the Cazadero River, it was a straightforward high-altitude trek at a slow and steady pace for four hours to ascend from the refuge to the summit at 4,000m. During the ascent we had fantastic views of Incahuasi, a 6,600m+ peak that dominated the horizon at the end of the valley.

On a very clear and hot day our first summit marked a successful start to the expedition.


 
 
 
 
 
 
At 4,000m, from the summit of Pastos Largos, we also had distant views of both Monte Pissis and Ojos del Salado, which we would attempt later in the expedition

Summit video – English Version

Summit video – Spanish Version

You can hear my thoughts on the expedition so far on this ipadio phonecast, which I posted after descending back to the refuge.

You can read the story of the whole expedition in the official Expedition Report below, which is also available for download: